Sunday, August 16, 2009

Did Humans and Dinosaurs Co-Exist?


The Taylor Trail:A series of 14 sequential human footprints on the same platform with at least 134 dinosaur tracks.

Introduction:

Here is a photo of the Paluxy River in Glen Rose Texas. This rapidly flowing river runs through the middle of Dinosaur Valley State Park, famous for its dinosaur tracks. Not as well known is the fact that human tracks have also been found, not only in the same formation, but on the same bedding plane and in some cases overlapping the dinosaur tracks.

Stan Taylor (pointing at track) began his excavation of the Taylor Trail in 1969 and continued working through 1972. Initially, only two tracks could be seen in the Paluxy River bed.
(Click on photo for high resolution)

By following the trail back under the river bank, seven more very human like tracks were exposed. The process involved removing tons of limestone overburden, effectively eliminating the possibility that the tracks were carved.
(Click on photo for high resolution)

The Taylor Trail, as it normally appears in the river under water. Subsequent excavation has extended the trail to a total of fourteen tracks in a consistent right-left pattern. The entire sequence can be seen through the water in this 1994 photograph, even though a thin layer of mud obscures the details. A trail of three-toed dinosaur tracks can be seen crossing at an angle of approximately 30 degrees.
(Click on photo for high resolution)

The drought of 1999 revealed the entire trail in dramatic detail!
(Click on photo for high resolution)
Could the human tracks have been made much later?Suppose you saw several footprints in a sidewalk and someone said, "This print was made ten years after the one beside it." Would you buy that? No way! We understand that tracks in mud do not last long. To be preserved, they must be solidified rapidly, within days. Once the material hardens, the tracks are preserved and footprints will no longer leave an impression. Furthermore, exposed tracks weather rapidly. Therefore, we know the next layer was deposited immediately and rapidly.
The Taylor Trail Photo Gallery:



Thumbnail of Photo
Track Number
Description




-3B
This fossil footprint (-3B) is in the bed of the Paluxy River near Glen Rose, Texas. It is one of a 14 track sequence called the Taylor Trail. The tracks are consistently 11.5" in length with consistently alternating rights and lefts. They are among and, in this case, within dinosaur tracks.
(Click on photo for high resolution)

-3B
This print is one of the most spectacular in the sequence. When examined carefully a right human foot print can be seen in compelling detail, almost completely within a dinosaur foot print. Click on this picture to highlight the details of these two amazing prints.(Click on photo for high resolution)

-3B
Click here to see the outline of the dino track, then the outline of where the human stepped partially in the dino track.
(Click on photo for high resolution)

-3B
Click here to see an outline imposed on a close up of the toes.(Click on photo for high resolution)
-3B destroyed once for all time!

-3B
This is one of three tracks featured at the 1989 Dayton, TN creation conference that was destroyed the next day. On August 12, 1989 Dr. Don Patton spoke at a creation conference in Dayton, TN. He presented compelling evidence that both human and dinosaur tracks were present at the Taylor Trail, including the above pictures. Two well known evolutionists were present and at least one was conspicuously disturbed by this presentation. Both flew to Dallas the next morning and went immediately to the Paluxy River. It is reliably reported that they were in the river that afternoon with an "iron bar." Three days before they were in the river the footprint was observed looking like the picture above. Three days after they were in the river, it was observed looking like the picture left. (Clear photography was not possible till the water went down several months later, when this photograph was taken.)

Taken from: http://www.bible.ca/tracks/taylor-trail.htm

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